Tuesday, July 19, 2011

Guest Post — Frames

I have asked Steve to explain how we got the frames on my pictures.
                                        I might add that I first saw similar framing at 
Picture Imperfect     Thanks Krista for getting me started on this idea.

Here is Steve's post.

A little while ago Mom asked me help her out with creating an action in Photoshop for a framing effect that she wanted to use for her blog posts... turns out a lot of you have really enjoyed this little effect and so she has asked me to "guest post" on her site and let you know how to create this simple yet pretty border look.  So here goes...

This was all done in Photoshop CS5, the steps should be the same for any other version of Photoshop as well, however I'm not sure if Photoshop Elements would allow for some of these or the creation of this as an action.  So to start with we'll go through the creation of the action.  First open up the image of your choice, then make 2 duplicate layers by hitting Cmd+J twice or go to Layer > Duplicate Layer and hitting OK twice from the menu.  Now make sure the top layer is selected and hit Cmd+T on Mac or go to Edit > Transform > Scale from the menu, at the top of the screen you will see several sizing boxes with the 3rd & 4th ones being set to 100.00%, click on the "Link" or "Lock Aspect Ratio" button between these two and enter 90% and hit enter.  You can set this value to any value you like but in our examples this is what we have chosen.  No go to the bottom of your layers palette and click on the fx button (second from the left) and choose drop shadow.  This will create a layer drop shadow behind the image, in our example we have used the following values, Distance 0, Spread 18, Size 73... keep in mind that we are doing this to full resolution images, if you decide to do this with smaller images these values will change accordingly.  Next select the next layer down which should be Layer 1 and add a Gaussian Blur... Filter > Blur > Gaussian Blur... we have chosen a Radius of 40 pixels in our examples.  Then lastly we did a slight Levels adjustment to make the background slightly lighter then the main image by going to Levels, you can do this by hitting Cmd+L on Mac or going to Image > Adjustments > Levels and setting the mid point value which by default is set to 1.00 to 1.34.  Then save the image as a Jpeg ready for printing or web use.  
So this runs through how to create the action but there is one more little trick that is wonderful if you have 100 images you'd like to run this on.  Navigate to http://www.russellbrown.com/scripts.html , Dr. Brown has created an absolutely amazing little scrip that you can install in CS5 to make your life so easy.  Scroll down till you find CS5 Scripts and look for Image Processor Pro, it's a free script and it will allow you select 5, 12, 23 or how ever many images you like in Bridge and running this action on all of them at the same time.    I won't go into details of using this script or installing it as he has also created a very helpful video tutorial on it on his site.

I hope this answers all of your questions on this framing action... enjoy!

Steve Hiebert







14 comments:

  1. George has Photoshop and I have Elements... I'm sure he will be thrilled to have this info.. Thanks, Ruth --and Steve.
    Hugs,
    Betsy

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  2. Thanks to both of you for this tutorial. I can hardly wait to try this out.

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  3. This is all Greek to me, I have never used a photo editing program! But I see that George and Betsy are crazy about it, and I know others smarter than I am will be, too. I doubt I would be smart enough to do this even if I did figure it out, so I will just enjoy the beautiful results that you get and let you do all the work!

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  4. I have Elements but I will give it a try.

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  5. Thanks so much for the tutorial. I have CS4, but I've been so intimidated by it that I haven't really spent much time with it. Maybe this will give me the incentive to learn at least one thing.

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  6. I have played with this a little bit. Thank you for the info, and will try it out soon.

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  7. Smart fellow you have. I am afraid I will just have to keep what I have. He gives great instructions, but still not for me.

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  8. it's always nice to have a little help....great tutorial!!!

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  9. Thanks! I'll have to see if I can do this in PSE. :)

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  10. Thank you to STeve for the tutorial.I have elements 7 but yesterday I found a book in my sons house with CS 3. I have already been looking in the book for a bit but am going back to it again. Thank you Steve and Ruth.

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  11. Thanks for the turorial, Steve. I have PSE, but I'll make an attempt to see how this works in Elements. It will have to wait a bit until I get my new computer set up--my old dinosaur is way too slow to do much experimenting on.

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  12. I think it's so cool that Steve was willing to guest post for the benefit of your blogger friends. That's very kind and thoughtful! Between you and me Ruth, I'm with Ginny - it was all Greek to me, lol. I'm so glad it will benefit others!

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  13. It seems all of us have PSE, but are willing to try something new! Very well given information, makes your tutorial a jewel. Thanks!

    ___
    Story telecom

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  14. I used PSE and figured more or less how to do this! Great instructions!

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Ruth